Idaho Democratic Party members participate in finalizing the party platform at the 2024 state convention held at the University of Idaho in Moscow on June 23, 2024. (Mia Maldonado/Idaho Capital Sun)

The Idaho Democratic Party adopted changes to its platform at its biennial convention on Sunday, adding significant changes to the party’s stance on education, health care and natural resources.

The updated platform will guide the party for the next two years. This year’s changes highlight the Idaho Democratic Party’s response to laws passed in recent years in Idaho’s supermajority Republican Legislature that restrict abortion and library material access. The updated platform also represents the party’s opposition to using public funding for private school vouchers.

On the last day of the convention held at the University of Idaho, party members spent the first 30 minutes finalizing the platform by debating inclusive terminology, including how to refer to LGBTQ+ people and minorities. After closing debate on inclusive terminology and grammar suggestions, the party moved to vote in favor of its new platform.

There are seven parts to the Idaho Democratic Party’s platform — beginning with its preamble. The biggest change to the party’s preamble is newly added support for the Second Amendment and gun safety.

In the education section of the platform, the party voted to “stand against siphoning off public tax dollars for nonpublic school voucher schemes,” and to “protect access to books and educational materials in libraries and in the classroom.” The platform also added a sentence to support early childhood and special education.

In the economy section of the platform, Idaho Democrats added sections in support of renewable energy and child care investments, and members voted on protecting Medicare and Social Security benefits, the right to unionize, and promoting local agriculture.

The “Equity, Justice and Opportunity for All” section remains largely the same, which states that the party will promote equal rights, particularly for minorities.

The party made significant changes to its health care section, calling for more reproductive freedom — such as legal access to abortion, contraceptives and in vitro fertilization. The updated platform includes support for “the right of individuals to make their own medical decisions, including gender-affirming care.” The updated platform also addresses concerns that health care providers are leaving Idaho, and it states that the party will support policies for health care providers who “fear criminalization for providing evidence-based care.”

Journalists barred from observing first day of Idaho Republican State Convention

Additions to the democracy section of the platform include fighting against white supremacy and promoting government transparency. During a platform committee meeting Saturday afternoon, party members agreed to include support for freedom of the press in response to journalists being barred from two days of activity at the Idaho Republican Party’s state convention last week in Coeur d’Alene. Journalists were allowed to attend all proceedings at the Idaho Democratic Party’s convention.

Lastly, the party added changes to its stance on natural resources, affirming scientific evidence of climate change and supporting renewable energy investments. The party also called to protect Idaho’s water resources and public lands use for agriculture and recreation.

The 2024 party platform will be uploaded to the Idaho Democratic Party’s website at a later time.

The party also passed nine resolutions addressing local and national issues, including resolutions that:

Resolutions are adopted by the Idaho Democratic Party directing the party to take action or to express its formal stance on a specific topic.

The Idaho Democratic Party adopted changes to its platform at its biennial convention on Sunday, adding significant changes to the party’s stance on education, health care and natural resources.

The updated platform will guide the party for the next two years. This year’s changes highlight the Idaho Democratic Party’s response to laws passed in recent years in Idaho’s supermajority Republican Legislature that restrict abortion and library material access. The updated platform also represents the party’s opposition to using public funding for private school vouchers.

On the last day of the convention held at the University of Idaho, party members spent the first 30 minutes finalizing the platform by debating inclusive terminology, including how to refer to LGBTQ+ people and minorities. After closing debate on inclusive terminology and grammar suggestions, the party moved to vote in favor of its new platform.

There are seven parts to the Idaho Democratic Party’s platform — beginning with its preamble. The biggest change to the party’s preamble is newly added support for the Second Amendment and gun safety.

In the education section of the platform, the party voted to “stand against siphoning off public tax dollars for nonpublic school voucher schemes,” and to “protect access to books and educational materials in libraries and in the classroom.” The platform also added a sentence to support early childhood and special education.

In the economy section of the platform, Idaho Democrats added sections in support of renewable energy and child care investments, and members voted on protecting Medicare and Social Security benefits, the right to unionize, and promoting local agriculture.

The “Equity, Justice and Opportunity for All” section remains largely the same, which states that the party will promote equal rights, particularly for minorities.

The party made significant changes to its health care section, calling for more reproductive freedom — such as legal access to abortion, contraceptives and in vitro fertilization. The updated platform includes support for “the right of individuals to make their own medical decisions, including gender-affirming care.” The updated platform also addresses concerns that health care providers are leaving Idaho, and it states that the party will support policies for health care providers who “fear criminalization for providing evidence-based care.”

Journalists barred from observing first day of Idaho Republican State Convention

Additions to the democracy section of the platform include fighting against white supremacy and promoting government transparency. During a platform committee meeting Saturday afternoon, party members agreed to include support for freedom of the press in response to journalists being barred from two days of activity at the Idaho Republican Party’s state convention last week in Coeur d’Alene. Journalists were allowed to attend all proceedings at the Idaho Democratic Party’s convention.

Lastly, the party added changes to its stance on natural resources, affirming scientific evidence of climate change and supporting renewable energy investments. The party also called to protect Idaho’s water resources and public lands use for agriculture and recreation.

The 2024 party platform will be uploaded to the Idaho Democratic Party’s website at a later time.

The party also passed nine resolutions addressing local and national issues, including resolutions that:

Resolutions are adopted by the Idaho Democratic Party directing the party to take action or to express its formal stance on a specific topic.

Idaho Capital Sun is part of States Newsroom, a nonprofit news network supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Idaho Capital Sun maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Christina Lords for questions: info@idahocapitalsun.com. Follow Idaho Capital Sun on Facebook and X.

Our stories may be republished online or in print under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. We ask that you edit only for style or to shorten, provide proper attribution and link to our website. AP and Getty images may not be republished. Please see our republishing guidelines for use of any other photos and graphics.

Mia Maldonado joined the Idaho Capital Sun after working as a breaking news reporter at the Idaho Statesman. She previously interned at the Idaho Capital Sun through the Voces Internship of Idaho, an equity-driven program for young Latinos to work in Idaho news. Born and raised in Coeur d’Alene, Mia moved to the Treasure Valley for college where she graduated from the College of Idaho with a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and international political economy.

Idaho Capital Sun is part of States Newsroom, the nation’s largest state-focused nonprofit news organization.

The Idaho Capital Sun is the Gem State’s newest nonprofit news organization delivering accountability journalism on state politics, health care, tax policy, the environment and more.

We’re part of States Newsroom, the nation’s largest state-focused nonprofit news organization.

Our stories may be republished online or in print under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. We ask that you edit only for style or to shorten, provide proper attribution and link to our website.

By admin